Rigshospitalet
Department of Radiation Biology

Neuro-Oncology

Primary brain tumors in adults. Read pdf-document (in Danish).
Common strategy for treatment of adult patients diagnosed with primary brain tumor. Read pdf-document (in Danish).
 

Brain Tumors
Malignant brain tumor in adults is a deadly disease. At present, brain tumors are treated by surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy used either individually or in combination. Overall, only 31 percent of males and 30 percent of females survive five years following the diagnosis of a primary or malignant brain tumor.

Symptoms of a brain tumor can include headaches (headaches that wake you up in the morning), seizures in a person who does not have a history of seizures, cognitive or personality changes, eye weakness, nausea or vomiting, speech disturbances, or memory loss. While these are the most common symptoms of a brain tumor, they can also indicate other medical problems.

The most common adult brain tumor is called a glioma, and can be divided into two groups, low-grade glioma and high-grade glioma. High-grade glioma can be divided into two groups, anaplastic astrocytoma and Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

GBM is the most common primary malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system in adults. Treatment outcomes remain poor and even after multimodal therapies, including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, the median survival is ~1 year. GBM can be divided into secondary and primary GBM. The secondary GBMs are also called "progressive glioblastomas" because they have progressed from low-grade astrocytic tumors to the high-grade glioblastoma. The transition from a low-grade astrocytoma to a malignant GBM involves acquisition of genetic alterations. In light of this, the progressive glioblastomas are very often correlated with p53 mutation, while the primary glioblastomas often are associated with overexpression of EGFR (60-80%) and/or expression of the constitutively active variant EGFRvIII (30-80%).

 

 

 

The Finsencenter, Section 6321, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark